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How Much Should an Engagement Ring Cost?

on May 19, 2020 11:40 AM
how much should an engagement ring cost

As I’m sure you’ve heard, the old adage advises an engagement ring should cost roughly the equivalent of two months’ salary. That out-of-date advice came from a De Beers marketing campaign to create buzz around diamonds.

If we were to do some quick math and look at national salary averages over the first quarter in 2020, the most recent data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics indicates that would equal $7,592 (based on 8 weeks.)

However, according to The Knot 2019 Jewelry and Engagement Study, the average cost of an engagement ring was $5,900 in 2019. Keep in mind, that this average engagement ring cost is based on a national average taken by 8,882 respondents from all over the United States.

Engagement Ring Cost By Region

In their findings, The Knot broke down engagement ring costs by region, which does shine a little more light onto this national average of $5,900.

  • Mid-Atlantic: $7,500
  • New England: $6,900
  • Southwest: $5,600
  • West: $5,500
  • Southeast: $5,400
  • Midwest: $5,300

Also noteworthy, one-third of these 8,882 respondents spent between $1,000 - $3,000 on a ring, while 10 percent spent $1,000 or less.

If you haven't already guessed, the overarching theme to this blog is that no single price range is right for everyone. So, how do you decide how much to spend on your engagement ring? 

Start with choosing one of these four strategies:
 

Set a Ring Budget and Stick to It

There are many factors that come into play when figuring out your engagement ring budget. After all, it’s possible that your finances will merge once you get married, so it’s best to think about your financial future as a whole.

Here are a few things to consider when budgeting for your engagement ring:

Your current income.

Your monthly expenses like food, rent/mortgage, bills and re-occurring debt (like student loans and car payments.) Make sure you can still pay for these things while budgeting for an engagement ring.

Your savings. How much have you saved up already and how much more money could you save if you cut down on unnecessary spending?

Preference. What does your spouse-to-be want in a ring? If a large diamond is on her mind, do your best to accommodate her wishes. If she’d like to go with something a little simpler, then scale back your budget.

The only downside to budgeting before checking out any rings is that you may find yourself (or your fiancée-to-be) disappointed with the ring options available.

Instead of budget first, ring second, you could ...

Ring Shop, Then Save

Especially if this is your first major jewelry purchase, you may wind up with a more satisfying result if you determine exactly what parameters your ring must meet to satisfy your expectations before determining a hard-and-fast budget.

Make a date of it and do some ring shopping together. 31% of couples report shopping together for a ring, according to The Knot 2019 Jewelry & Engagement Study.

If you’re willing to stick out the pre-engaged phase for a little while, picking your dream ring and then saving up to pay for it straight-up is a great option. After all, the average time spend looking for a ring is about 3.5 months, with the average number of rings looked at before purchase is 26.

Finance Your Ring Purchase

Already have a dream ring in mind? One that doesn’t quite match your cash flow?

If waiting to get engaged isn’t an option, or at least isn’t a preferable option, there’s always financing.

Just keep in mind that whatever debt you take on pre-marriage will follow you both into your married years, when you’re likely to accumulate more debt from additional large purchases.

Money Under 30 has a great guide to financing an engagement ring.

Buy Smart, Upgrade Later

Maybe you have a specific ring in mind that doesn’t fit your current budget, but financing doesn’t appeal to you either.

Consider choosing a more affordable ring now, with a plan to upgrade a few years down the road.

Many jewelers have trade-in programs that allow you to purchase a new piece for up to double the value of the item you’re trading in. If you’re not overly sentimental about the exact diamond presented in the proposal, this route could be just right.

Even if you aren’t too keen on parting with the memory-laden diamond that made you a fiancée, you can always work with your jeweler to choose or design an affordable ring that’s conducive to upgrading without sacrificing too much of its original integrity.

In Conclusion

How much should an engagement ring cost? In the end, it should cost as much as is right for your preferences, goals, and budget. Hopefully the four strategies above help get you started in the right direction when buying an engagement ring.

Once you purchase your engagement ring, make sure you insure it. Get a simple, free quote in minutes by clicking the button below.
 

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